Skip to main content

Full text of "atari :: 400 800 :: CO60029 Atari Program-Text Editor 1981"

See other formats


800 



ATARI 
PROGRAM-TEXT EDITOR 



fM 




V 



K^. 







r 

r / 



* -^--^ J f*- 



^,:=iti 



sfci. 



^Ssi 



w 



ATARI 



A Warner Communications Company ^^ 



Use With 
ATARI* 800^" 
HOME COMPUTER 



ATARI 
PROGRAM-TEXT EDITOR 



A 



ATARP 

^^ A Warner Communications Company 



Every effort has been made to ensure that this manual accurately documents this product of the ATARI Computer Division. However, 
because of the ongoing improvement and update of the computer software and hardware, ATARI, INC. cannot guarantee the accuracy of 
printed material after the date of publication and cannot accept responsibility for errors or omissions. 

Reproduction is forbidden without the specific written permission of ATARI, INC., Sunnyvale, CA 94086. No right to reproduce this docu- 
ment, nor the subject matter thereof, is granted unless by written agreement with, or written permission from the Corporation. 



PRINTED IN U.S.A. MANUAL AND PROGRAM CONTENTS© 1981 ATARI, INC. 



PREFACE 



Your Program-Text Editor is a versatile tool. You can use it to edit source programs 
written in various programming languages. The addition of a printer and a pertinent 
software package to your system will make the editor an effective word processor. 

Introductory sections of this manual supply simple instructions for diskette opera- 
tions as well as rudimentary editing functions. Advanced and specialized editing 
techniques are treated factually. The error messages displayed on the back cover 
and the enclosed reference card provide quick and easy fingertip access to infor- 
mation. 



Preface v 



CONTENTS 



PREFACE 



1 SYSTEM REQU I REMENTS 



Setup Procedures 1 

Turning On the System 1 

Turning Off the System 2 

2 OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES FOR THE EDITOR 3 

Theory of Operation 6 

Starting the Edit Session 8 

Familiarity With the Keyboard 9 

Command Mode Operation 16 

Exiting the Editor 17 

Cursor Movement Commands 18 

Search Commands 19 

Block Commands 21 

Inserting and Deleting Commands 23 

Specialized Commands 25 

Large File Commands 26 

3 CUSTOMIZING THE EDITOR 31 

A-D— Parameters 32 

E— Set Tab Stops 32 

F— Set Maximum Line Length 33 

G— Set Minimum Growth 33 

H— Set Default Margins 33 

I— Set Color of Screen 33 

J— Set Miscellaneous Flags 34 

A— Return to Main Menu 34 

B -Set Type of Tab 34 

C-Set Tab Display Method 35 

D— Set Carriage Return Display 35 

E —Auto-Indention Feature 35 

F —Set Shifting Caselock 35 



Contents vii 



LLUSTRATIONS 



1 DOS II Menu 3 

2 Filename Prompt 4 

3 Normal Exit From the Editor 7 

4 Abort Exit From the Editor 7 

5 Illustration of Expanding Tabs 8 

6 Answering the Filename Prompt 8 

7 Windows 9 

8 Example of Entered Text 10 

9 Escape Sequence Characters 13 

10 Extension Group Prompt 31 

11 Customizing File Menu 32 

12 Customizing File Submenu J 34 



TABLES 



1 Immediate Mode Reserved Keystrokes 27 

2 Command Mode Instructions 28 

3 The ATARI Colors and Numbers 33 



viii Contents 



1 



SYSTEM REQUIREMENTS 



The ATARI® Program-Text Editor™ (Model No. CX8121) requires: 

• ATARI 810™ Disk Drive 

• ATARI Blank Diskette (CX8100) 

For information on your disk drive, refer to the ATARI 810 Disk Drive Operators 
Manual. Check the drive code setting to make certain that you have a disk drive 
designated as Drive 1. Because the Disk Operating System (DOS) II programs are 
included on the diskette containing the Program-Text Editor, you can easily load 
the editor software by inserting your diskette in Drive 1 , Otherwise, you must have 
a copy of the DOS II Master Diskette, Model No. CX8101, inserted into Drive 1. 

You must have at least 24K RAM in your ATARI Home Computer to operate the 
disk drive and the editor software. Although the software requires 24K memory, a 
total memory capacity of 32K is highly recommended and will result in increased 
program efficiency. For instructions on inserting additional ATARI RAM Memory 
Modules™ into the ATARI 800™ Computer, refer to the ATARI 800 Operators 
Manual. 



SETUP 
PROCEDURES 



TURNING ON 
THE SYSTEM 



1. Verify that all power switches (console and disk drive) are turned to OFF. 

2. Check that the computer console is properly connected to the television set 
and a standard wall outlet. 

3. Place the disk drive at least 1 2 inches away from your television set and plug it 
into a standard wall outlet. 

4. Connect the disk drive to either the computer console or another ATARI 
peripheral. Plug one end of the I/O Data Cord into the jack labeled I/O CON- 
NECTORS on the back of the disk drive. Plug the other end into either the 
jack labeled PERIPHERAL on the computer console or one of the I/O CON- 
NECTOR ports of another ATARI peripheral. If you connect your disk drive to 
another ATARI peripheral, verify that there is an I/O Data Cord plugged into 
the computer console. 

When you are ready to use the computer, proceed as follows: 

1. Turn on the television set. Tune to Channel 2 or Channel 3, whichever has a 
weaker signal in your area. Make certain that the 2-CHAN.-3 switch on the 
computer console corresponds to your channel selection. 



System Requirements 1 



2. Turn on the disk drive. Notice that the BUSY and PWR ON light indicators are 
activated. Wait until the motor of the disk drive stops its activity and the BUSY 
light goes out before continuing to the next step. 

3. Insert the diskette containing the Program-Text Editor into the disk drive 
designated as Drive 1 . 

Note: DO NOT TOUCH THE EXPOSED PORTION OF THE DISKETTE. 

4. Turn the computer console pouter switch to ON. This will activate the disk 
drive's loading procedure. 

Note: OPTIONAL. To increase the RAM buffer size on a 48K system, before turning 
on your computer, remove any language cartridge that might be installed. 

Take note of the following conditions to determine if you have successfully com- 
pleted the power-on procedure. If you have a language cartridge inserted into the 
computer console, the screen displays the prompt applicable to that particular 
language. For example, the ATARI BASIC language prompt is the READY message; 
the ASSEMBLER EDITOR language prompt is the EDIT message. Otherwise, the 
DOS Menu should appear immediately upon the screen. 



TURNING OFF 
THE SYSTEM 



Warning: NEVER turn off the disk drive with a diskette in it. You may damage the 
information contained on the diskette and lose the ability to load your program. 

When you are ready to end your editing session: 

1. Use the exit command appropriate for your editing session. 

2. Wait for the DOS II Menu display or the filename prompt to appear on the 
screen. 

3. Remove the diskette from the disk drive and return it to the protective sleeve 
that was provided with the software. 

4. You may turn off the television set, the computer, or the disk drive in any 
order. 



2 System Requirements 



OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES 

FOR THE EDITOR 



You must load the editor through the DOS Menu. If the DOS Menu is not already 
displayed on your screen, type DOS and press ^^. Refer to Figure 1 . (The DOS 
II Reference Manual contains complete instructions for using the DOS II Menu op- 
tions.) 



Figure 1 DOS II Menu 

Because the editor program is included on a diskette that has been factory write- 
protected for software safety, you must prepare a diskette for your text files. For 
identification purposes, we refer to this diskette as a "data" diskette. With the DOS 
Menu displayed on the screen, remove the diskette containing the Program-Text 
Editor software. Refer to the DOS II Reference Manual. Format a blank diskette, 
then write new DOS files to it. Remove this diskette and reinsert the editor program 
diskette. 

Select the L-BINARY LOAD command. Answer the prompt, LOAD FROM WHAT 
FILE, with the name of the Program-Text Editor software, MEDIT. The program will 
automatically run after being loaded. Refer to Figure 2. Insert your data diskette in- 
to the disk drive at this time. 

Caution: You may not change your data diskette once the editing session is started. 
Because the editor has built-in memory checks and free space allocation computa- 
tions, a memory map of the diskette inserted at the time the editor performs its 
check is always retained. Therefore, even though the editor's workspace resides in 
RAM, the block-write command can result in an overwrite situation on any but the 
original diskette. 



Operational Procedures 
for the Editor 



Note: Because the editor performs a free lOCB (Input/Output Control Block) 
check, you may receive the error message EDITOR CANNOT RUN - NO FREE 
lOCBs. PRESS ^a to return to DOS. Refer to the ATARI Operating System 
Manual (part number C016555) for complete information on lOCBs and to the er- 
ror messages on the back cover for an explanation of this condition. 



Figure 2 Filename Prompt 

Your Program-Text Editor is now ready to bring the file that you wish to edit into its 
workspace. At this point, there are several options available: 

• Press the i^3* key to end the edit session and return control to DOS. 

• Enter the filename of the program that you wish to edit. 

• Create a new file under the editor by naming a file that does not exist. The 
editor will automatically create an empty file using the specified name. 

The correct syntax for an acceptable filename is in the form: 
Dn:filename. extension, optional parameters separated by commas. 
Example: D4:MYFILE.MAC,3,.ASM,D 



The drive number n designation corresponds to the disk drive that contains your 
source program and must be between the numeric characters of one and eight. 
You may use a filename of from one to eight characters, either alpha characters A 
through Z or numeric characters through 9. 

Note: For a filename specification, an alpha character must be in the first character 
position. This rule does not apply to filename extensions. 

Your optional extension may be from one to three characters long, using either 
alpha or numeric characters. 



Operational Procedures 
4 for the Editor 



Remember the following specifications when answering the filename prompt. 



If no device is specified, the editor automatically assumes the use of the disk 
drive designated as Drive 1. 

Lowercase file specifications automatically convert to the correct uppercase 
syntax. 

If the file, its associated backup file, or its temporary file is locked (see the 
"Theory of Operation" section for further explanation), the editor displays 
the error message FILE LOCKED and reissues the filename prompt. Unlock 
any of these files through use of the DOS Menu. Refer to the ATARI DOS II 
Reference Manual. 



Optional parameters may be entered in any order after the file specification: 



,n OVERRIDE DESTINATION DRIVE. Unless otherwise specified, the default 
destination drive is the one on which the source file is located. You may move 
the destination file from the default drive by using this parameter. The value n is 
a numeric digit corresponding to the number of the destination disk drive. 

Example: MYFILE,2 



When you have more than one disk drive, use this optional parameter to edit 
large files or when there is not enough free space on the source diskette to allow 
you to save the edited file. 

,D DELETE BACKUP FILE FLAG. If a backup file exists, this parameter tells the 
editor to erase it before beginning the editing session. Use of this parameter 
allocates free space at the cost of backup file protection. 

Example: MYFILE,D 

Note: If the source and destination drive are not the same, the editor 
automatically deletes a file with the same name on the destination drive. 



,.ext OVERRIDE CUSTOMIZING FILE. Use of this parameter causes the editor 
to use the customizing file associated with the designated extension file. Unless 
this parameter is assigned, the editor defaults to use of the extension associated 
with the file specification being edited. 

Example: MYFILE,.PAS 
MYFILE,.ASM 
MYFILE,.BAS 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 5 



Following are additional examples of valid filename prompt responses. 

MYFILE 

MYFILE.PAS 

D3:MYF1LE 

D3:MYF1LE,2 

MYFILE. PAS,D,4 

D2:MYFILE,.PAS,D,3 

MYFILE,. ASM 

d2:myfile,.pas,d,3 

D4:MYFILE.BAS,3,.PAS,D 

After receiving the filename specification, your Program-Text Editor checks the free 
space on the destination diskette and makes a comparison with the size of the file 
to edit. A minimum growth factor, considering the expansion of file storage capaci- 
ty requirements because of additions or modifications, of g units is ascertained. 
(See the "Customizing the Editor" section.) If there is not enough room on the 
diskette for the edit file and the growth factor, the editor displays a warning 
message. You may choose to ignore the warning and continue with the editing ses- 
sion. Or you may abort the edit, exit from the editor, and return to the DOS Menu. 
If the editor determines that there is enough room on the diskette for the edit file 
and growth factor, the edit session begins. 

Caution: If you ignore the warning message, be sure that you have as much free 
space as the size of your existing file plus room for any additions you will make dur- 
ing the editing session. If your calculations are not correct and you run out of free 
space on the diskette, you may lose all work completed in the current editing ses- 
sion. 

Note: A minimum growth factor of g units is determined from the customizing file. 
If default factors are used, the minimum growth factor is 100 sectors of free space. 



THEORY OF 
OPERATION 



For efficiency and optimum protection, the Program-Text Editor uses a common 
two-file editing method. During the editing session, the original file remains intact 
while all modifications are made to a copy of the file. Therefore, this procedure 
allows for: 



• Automatic backup copies of files to be edited 

• Modification of the original file only after the editing session is terminated 
with a normal exit from the editor 

• Use of sequential file access 

A procedural outline of the two-file method is: 

• Text is copied from the file to be edited into a memory buffer. 

• When the buffer becomes full, data transfers to a temporary file. 



Operational Procedures 
6 for the Editor 



Normal exit (Figure 3) from the editor causes the following sequence: 

• The .BAKfile is deleted. 

• The edited file is renamed as the new .BAK file. 

• The temporary file is renamed as the edited file. 



BEFORE 
EXIT 


FILE 


BAK 




FILE 




FILE . TMP 










'' 




" 


AFTER 
EXIT 




FILE . BAK 




FILE 



Figure 3 Normal Exit From the Editor 



An abort exit (Figure 4) from the editor causes the following sequence: 

• The temporary file is deleted. 

• The original edited file and the .BAKfile retain their integrity. 



BEFORE 
EXIT 


FILE . BAK 




FILE 




FILE 


TMP 






' 




1 


' 








AFTER 
EXIT 


FILE . BAK 




FILE 







Figure 4 Abort Exit From the Editor 



Your Program-Text Editor uses two modes of operation: immediate and command. 
Immediate mode operation is keyboard interactive. Command mode operation 
defers to a later time execution. All three windows and both operation modes are 
discussed at length in subsequent sections of this manual. 

The Program-Text Editor is defined as a source file editor. A source file is a disk file 
consisting of ATASCII characters terminated by ATASCII EOLs (End-of-Line). 
Therefore, the editor functions with files containing the source code written for 
ATARI Computer programming languages. A line length default value of 114 
columns can be changed to a maximum length of 200 columns by using the 
customizing file feature (see section titled "Customizing the Editor"). 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 7 



Two types of tabs are allowed: (1) regular tabulation as provided by the operating 
system in which blanks are substituted between tab stops or (2) expanding tabs. Ex- 
panding tabs only take one character in the file but are displayed as many columns 
of blanks. Set the type of tab by using the customizing file. 



LINE OF TEKT-35 CHARACTERS 
LIME OF TEKT 
LINE OF TEKT 

5 character displacement = 5 bytes of memory 

using default value of 5, inserting blanks like the operating system 



OF TEKT-35 CHARACTERS 
LINE OF TEKT 
LINE OF TEKT 




5 character displacement = 1 byte of memory 
using expanding tabs 



Figure 5 Illustration of Expanding Tabs 



If you attempt to edit a file that does not meet source file definitions and customiz- 
ing column limits, the editor truncates the lines in the file to conform to the set line 
length limits. Given this situation, the editor generates the LINE TOO LONG error 
message while reading the file either during initial entry to the editor or as an input 
command. 

STARTING THE Answer the filename prompt. For the purposes of demonstration, enter the 
EDIT SESSION filename PRACTICE. Refer to Figure 6. 



Figure 6 Answering the Filename Prompt 



Operational Procedures 
8 for the Editor 



Notice the three windows displayed on the screen: 
TEXT WINDOW 



ERROR WINDOW 



Appears at the top of the screen and consists of 20 
lines. 

Appears in inverse video and consists of a single line. 



COMMAND WINDOW Appears at the bottom of the screen and consists of 

three lines. 



Figure 7 Windows 



FAMILIARITY a summary of the immediate keystroke commands appears at the end of this 

WITH section. 

THE KEYBOARD 



» 



From the keyboard shown above, locate the following specific keys: ^H, ^^8/ 
^^^^^^B'^^B- ^ote that there are keys indicating directional arrows as well 
as arithmetic operators. Some keys serve a dual purpose, for example, the 
^^^^^^^. As the operation of the ^^B key on the computer keyboard is the 
same as the shift key of a typewriter, its use will select the function that appears on 
the top of the key. 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 9 



Enter the following text onto your screen: 

AND HERE WE SEE THE INVISIBLE BOY^i^ 
IN HIS LOVELY INVISIBLE HOUSE, |^S 
FEEDING A PIECE OF INVISIBLE CHEESE ^^ 
TO HIS LITTLE INVISIBLE MOUSE. ^^^ 



Figure 8 Example of Entered Text 

After entering the lines, notice the following: every time you press the ^^^H ^^V' 
an >!' appears on the screen. This figure indicates the carriage return action. Also, 
pay particular attention to the movement of the cursor. During execution of the 
keystroke entry, the cursor position indicates character placement by appearing 
immediately in front of the next entry. After any keystroke, the text window is up- 
dated to reflect the current state of the file, and the cursor moves accord- 
ingly. Look again at the above screen diagram and note the cursor positioning. 

Using the table below, manipulate the cursor within your displayed text. 

Keystroke Explanation 

-^ Moves cursor left 

-*■ Moves cursor right 

i Moves cursor down one physical line 

t Moves cursor up one physical line 

2 Moves cursor to beginning of logical line 

3 Moves cursor to end of logical line 

After you feel thoroughly acquainted with the movement produced by striking 
these keys, follow the procedure outlined below: 

Position the cursor on the "A" of the first word in the first line of your text. Use the 
^3 *- keystroke. Now use the ^^ t keystroke. Note that both of these opera- 
tions result in the warning message CURSOR AT END. The same error message will 
be displayed if you usea^gg-* ifthe cursor is in the far right position at the end of 
text. 



Operational Procedures 
10 for the Editor 



Note: When the cursor moves up and down a slight glitter of the screen may occur. 
Also, on occasion, you may notice the appearance of an additional line below the 
command window. These are normal operating conditions. 

Notice that these cursor-movement keystrokes position the cursor but do not affect 
the entered text. Within the immediate mode operation, there are essentially two 
types of keystrokes: those that directly relate to cursor positioning and those that 
execute a change to the text itself. You must position the cursor at a precise point 
using the above key combinations. Refer to the table below for those keystrokes 
that will immediately edit entered text. 



Keystroke 



Explanation 




Regular keys 



Inserts a blank line above the current logical line 

Deletes character left of cursor 

Deletes character right of cursor 

Deletes the logical line occupied by cursor 

Insert character into text 



Within the framework of this software and as a matter of convention, this manual 
introduces the terms logical line and physical line. A logical line contains those 
characters entered between carriage returns. A physical line encompasses those 
characters contained in a straight line from the extreme left side to the extreme 
right side position of your television screen. A logical line can be one or more 
physical lines. 



Return to your screen. You must use your cursor control keys to move your cursor 
during an edit session. Position the cursor so that it is over the "v" in the word "in- 
visible." Use the ^^^^^^S key twice. (Do not press ^^^§. Pressing the 
^^^^ key at any time will introduce a carriage return figure, i into your text.) 



Take note of several unique conditions that might arise from operation of the 



If the cursor is to the right of a carriage return, use either the I^^^^^^S ^^Y ^^ 
the ^^B "^ ^^y to reposition the cursor. However, when the cursor is to the im- 
mediate right of a carriage return, use of the ^^^^^^B ^^V deletes the carriage 
return itself. Similarly, if the cursor is to the left of a carriage return, use of the ^^p 
^^^^^^g key repositions the cursor exactly as use of the ^^^ ^ key. 
However, when the cursor is to the immediate left of a carriage return, use of the 
^M ^^^^MM^§ ^^y removes the carriage return itself. Concatenation follows 
the carriage return deletion. If the maximum line length is exceeded, the editor: 

• Restores the deleted carriage return 

• Aborts the command line 

• Displays the error message LINE TOO LONG 

• Returns to immediate mode operation 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 1 1 



Other specific conditions that result when the cursor is positioned: 



Within an expanding tab 

At the beginning of the buffer 

Above the text window 

At the end of the buffer 



Use of either keystroke deletes the en- 
tire tab. 

Use of the ^^^^® key results in 
no operation and generates the error 
CURSOR AT END. 

Use of the l^^g^l key causes an 
automatic scroll that pulls down the 
previous line. 

Use ot the ®g^g ^s^-M^S key 
results in no operation and generates 
the error CURSOR AT END. 



Note: Attempted deletion of the last carriage return in the buffer is illegal and 
results in the CURSOR AT END error message. Use a delete line operation to suc- 
cessfully remove this last carriage return. 



Follow the same procedure to acquaint yourself with the use of the other 
keystrokes outlined in the table. Use cursor control keystrokes to position the cur- 
sor. Select the appropriate key to accomplish the desired change. Use cursor con- 
trol keystrokes to remove the cursor from the logical line. 



On the ATARI Computer keyboard, locate the ^^ key. Use this key in conjunc- 
tion with control graphics keys to print specific graphics characters. Refer to Figure 
9 for keystroke combinations to produce a chosen graphics display. 



Operational Procedures 
12 for the Editor 



Press the ^ key gg^ to get 

and then press: 





















Press the ^S key ftB to 8®* 

and then press the 
^^B ^^y simultaneously 
with: 








a 



Press the ^g key I^BI to get 

and then press the 
^^8 key simultaneously 
with; 



a 

E 




F/gure 9 Escape Sequence Characters 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 13 



If the cursor is within an expanding tab or to the right of a carriage return when a 
character is inserted into text, the editor automatically repositions the tab or car- 
riage return to the right of the cursor. 

Additional cursor movement keystrokes: 

Keystroke Explanation 

Displays previous screen 
Displays next screen 



Use the keystrokes above to respectively display either 20 physical lines above or 
below the text window. Additional reserved keystrokes include: 

Keystroke Explanation 

Tabs to next tab stop 

Returns and auto-indents to same level 

Toggles visible-tab mode 

Toggles visible-carriage return mode 



Use the l^^^^g^ key to position the cursor. Space tabs insert a selected number 
of blanks between tab stops, and the cursor positions itself accordingly. Expanding 
tabs, however, insert a character into the text that indicates the tab function. By us- 
ing the customizing file, you can display the expanding tab character as either 
blanks or a right triangle followed by periods. Set your default choice within the 
parameters of the customizing file. If you have chosen the expanding tab option, 
^^^ the ^^B ^^^^^B immediate mode keystroke command to display the 
alternate character choice. 



Carriage returns can be displayed as blanks or down-arrows. Default choice is set 
within the parameters of the customizing file. Use the ^^^^^|^^ immediate 
mode keystroke to display the alternate character choice. 

Auto-indention allows you to reposition the cursor to return to an automatic tab 
stop on the next logical line. Press the ^^B and ^^^B ^^Y^ simultaneously. The 
indention of the logical line containing the cursor determines the position of the 
automatic tab. 



Operational Procedures 
14 for the Editor 



Keystroke Command 

g Erases the error window 

Executes command window 
Selects the alternate command line 
Changes mode 
Aborts command being executed 

Error messages displayed within the error window are cleared in three ways: 

• Pressing the ^Qf ^^S keys will clear the error. 

• If a syntax error occurs, the window clears when the command is corrected. 

• After four seconds of elapsed time, the error window automatically clears 
with any keystroke entry. 

Use the ^^S key to change operation modes. In immediate mode operation, use 
of ^|t|^^ enters command mode. Switching these operation modes automatically 
clears the current command window. To avoid this erasure, use the ^^^ f^^^ 
combination keystroke. The current command line remains intact, and the cursor 
positions itself at the end of the command line. 

Within the command mode, all keystrokes enter text into the command window. 
All immediate and reserved keystrokes, with the exception of ^^^^^S can 
still be executed. Use of the ^^^^^^S key deletes the last character typed into 
the command window. Pressing ^^^§ twice while in command mode deletes the 
entire command line. 

During execution of the command window, the editor is in command mode. 
Notice that the cursor remains in the command window while the command is be- 
ing executed. After successful completion of the command execution, the cursor 
disappears from the command window and the editor returns to immediate mode 
operation. Use the ^^^H key to rotate displays of the command line and any 
alternate entry. Touch the ^^B key during execution of the command line to 
discontinue processing. As soon as the current command execution is completed, 
a BREAK KEY ABORT message appears in the error window, and the editor returns 
to immediate mode operation. Touching ^^B ^t any other time has no effect. 

In command mode, the use of ^1^^ returns control to immediate mode. The 
command line remains in the command window for later execution. Use the ^^^ 
key to execute commands within the command window. A NOT COMPLETE error 
message results when a command contains a syntax error. The editor remains in 
command mode so that correction can be made. Executing a blank command or 
an empty display window returns control to immediate mode. 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 1 5 



COMMAND 

MODE 

OPERATION 



The command window accepts and displays all keystroke entries made in com- 
mand mode operation. With the exception of the ^^^^^^B key, all immediate 
reserved keystrokes function identically within either operation mode. The com- 
mand window is three physical lines long and allows a single command line that is 
made up of one or more commands. You may enter spaces between commands 
for better readability, and use either upper- or lowercase. Within the command 
window, a carriage return is displayed as the inverse Q escape sequence 
character. A mini-interpreter checks each keystroke for valid syntax. The following 
syntax error messages may be displayed: 



• UNRECOGNIZED COMMAND 

• DELIMITER ERROR 

• NUMBER TOO BIG 



If a syntax error occurs, the editor ignores all keystrokes until you delete the offend- 
ing character from the command window. Manipulation of the command window 
is as follows: 



key returns the editor to immediate mode operation. 
J^^ key pressed twice erases the entire command window. 

key deletes the last character entered into the command win- 



dow 



g^-^ key executes the command line if the syntax is correct and complete. 

g^^g; key swaps the command line displayed in the command window with 
an alternate command line. 



After execution of the command line, the editor returns to immediate mode opera- 
tion. The command line is not erased and may be reexecuted by pressing ^^•§. 



Operational Procedures 
16 for the Editor 



EXITING THE EDITOR 

Depending upon your desired end result, choose one of the following options to 
exit from the editor: 



Command 

EXIT 



Explanation 

Use this command to exit from the 
editor and return to DOS. All changes 
made during the edit session are re- 
tained. 



EXIT2 Use this command to exit from and 

restart the editor. In effect, this com- 
mand duplicates the action of EXIT 
followed by the DOS "L" (load) com- 
mand, and you will receive the editor 
sign-on filename prompt. 

ABORT Use this command to exit from the 

editor without incorporating any 
changes made during the edit session 
and return control to DOS. 

ABORT2 Use this command to exit without in- 

corporating any changes made during 
the edit session and restart the editor. 
In effect, this command duplicates the 
action of ABORT and DOS "L" (load) 
commands. You will receive the editor 
sign-on filename prompt. 

REOPEN Use this command to exit from the 

editor and automatically reenter the 
same file. In effect, this command 
duplicates the action of EXIT2 and 
answering the filename prompt with the 
specification of the file you are editing. 
See "Specialized Commands" within 
this section for specific details. 

Note: The editor accepts the exiting commands in the form EXITn and ABORTn as 
valid syntax. However, at execution time, the error message NUMBER TOO BIG is 
generated if n is greater than 2. 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 17 



CURSOR MOVEMENT COMMANDS 



You may manipulate the cursor through command mode operation. This method 
lets you quickly move the cursor to where you want it. To use the following table 
effectively, you must be familiar with two terms: buffer and file. In this particular 
software application, text is copied from the file to be edited into a memory buffer 
where modification is achieved. When the memory buffer becomes full, it is writ- 
ten to a temporary file. This process is repeated continuously until all text has been 
copied from the edited file into a temporary file. As you can determine, the con- 
tents of the edited file and the memory buffer can differ. 

Note: Take care in planning your editing session. You cannot easily edit the portion 
of the file that has been written out of the buffer. Make your modifications from the 
beginning to the end of the file. To edit a part of the file that has already been writ- 
ten out of the buffer, use the REOPEN command (see "Specialized Commands" 
contained within this section) or reenter the editor. Both of these methods require 
lengthy disk access. 



Command Explanation 

CLn Moves cursor left n characters 

CRn Moves cursor right n characters 

CUn Moves cursor up n logical lines 

CDn Moves cursor down n logical lines 

CBB Moves cursor to beginning of buffer 

CEB Moves cursor to end of buffer 

CBF Moves cursor to beginning of file 

CEF Moves cursor to end of file 

CBL Moves cursor to beginning of the logical 

line 

CEL Moves cursor to end of the logical line 

CCn Moves cursor to column n (range 1-200) 

Note: The notation n signifies an optional numeric argument, which usually acts as 
a repeat counter, with a range of 1-65535. With the exception of margin values, if n 
is omitted, the editor assumes a value of 1. 

The error message CURSOR AT END is generated each time you attempt to posi- 
tion the cursor: 

• Left, before the beginning of the buffer 

• Right, past the end of the buffer 

• Up, before the beginning of the buffer 

• Down, past the end of the buffer 

Note: Each time the editor generates this error message, it aborts the command line 
and enters immediate mode operation. 

Use the cursor control movements to position the cursor at strategic locations to 
implement the more sophisticated commands available in the editor. 



Operational Procedures 
18 for the Editor 



SEARCH COMMANDS 

In the following commands, delimiters must be used to separate the string from the 
search command notation. You may either use the slash mark, /, or a set of quota- 
tion marks as delimiter characters. As an example, the SB/-/n command explained 
below can also be entered as SB"-"ii. You can use "wild cards" as a substitution 
for characters in a search string. The editor recognizes the inverse video question 
mark (?] as a wild card that will match any character while searching. (To display 
any inverse video characters from the ATARI 800 keyboard, use the g key.) 



Command Explanation 

SBA/n Search for nth occurrence of string in 

buffer 
SF/-/n Search for nth occurrence of string in 

file 
SRB/-/-/n Search and replace n times in buffer 

SRF/-/-/n Search and replace n times in file 

SRVB/-/-/n Search and replace with verify n times 

in buffer 
SRVF/-/-/n Search and replace with verify n times 

in file 

Note: The notation n signifies an optional numeric argument, which usually acts as 
a repeat counter, with a range of 1-65535. With the exception of margin values, if n 
is omitted, the editor assumes a value of 1 . 

In general, all string searches begin after the current cursor location. In successful 
file and buffer searches, the cursor is positioned after the nth occurrence of the 
string. The logical line containing the cursor is displayed as the first line of the text 
window. 



In unsuccessful buffer searches, the editor: 

• Retains the cursor in its original position 

• Generates a SEARCH FAILED error message 

• Aborts the command line 

• Returns to immediate mode operation 



In unsuccessful file searches, the editor repeatedly writes out the current buffer and 
reads a new buffer. If the end-of-file is reached before finding the nth occurrence of 
the string, the search fails. Then, the editor: 

• Retainsthe cursor in its original position if the last line in the file was already 
in the buffer before the search began or 

• Positions the cursor to the beginning of the last buffer read if new lines were 
introduced from the file to the buffer area 

• Follows the same procedure outlined above for unsuccessful buffer searches 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 19 



In general, the search and replace commands, perform a search for the first string 
and replace it with the designated second string for the specified n times. The 
replacement string may be null or have a different amount of characters than the 
search string. Care should be taken to avoid the following conditions resulting in 
error messages. As with all error conditions, the editor aborts the command line 
and returns to immediate mode operation. 



LINE TOO LONG 



LINE TOO LONG 



CURSOR AT END 



Could result if the insertion of a large 
replacement string into a text line ex- 
ceeds the maximum line length. 

Result of Operation: Only the first part 
of the replacement string would be in- 
serted into the text. 

Could result if the search string contains 
carriage returns. When a carriage return 
is deleted and the lines are con- 
catenated, the resulting new line could 
exceed the maximum line length. 

Result of Operation: The cursor is 
located to the right of a partial search 
string and that logical line is displayed 
as the first line of the text window. 

Could result if the search string ter- 
minates with a carriage return and is 
found on the last line of the buffer. 
Because the editor does not allow the 
last carriage return in the buffer to be 
deleted (except with a delete-line com- 
mand), this search results in the given 
error message. 

Result of Operation: The editor will find 
the string but abort the command line, 
resulting in no replacement. 



In unsuccessful buffer searches, the editor: 

• Retains the cursor in its original position if no replacement has been made or 

• Positions the cursor after the last successful replacement and 

- generates a SEARCH FAILED error message 

- aborts the command line 

- returns to immediate mode operation 

In unsuccessful file searches, the editor repeatedly writes out the current buffer and 
reads in a new one. If the end-of-file is found before the nth occurrence of the 
search string, the command fails. Then, the editor follows the same procedure as 
outlined above for unsuccessful buffer searches. 



Operational Procedures 
20 for the Editor 



Search and replace with verify commands for buffer and file use the same pro- 
cedure as those respective commands without verification. Additionally: 



• Before each replacement, the editor moves the cursor after the found search 
string and displays that logical line as the first line of the text window. 

• A prompt question appears in the error window 

R Signifies replacement of the search string 

S Signals a "skip" of this occurrence 

Q Terminates or prematurely "quits" the search and replace command. 

You may type your response in upper- or lowercase letters. If the response is valid, 
the editor clears the error window and completes the operation. If the response is 
invalid, your typed character is displayed; the cursor appears in the error window 
with a question mark. 



BLOCK COMMANDS 



You can manipulate a section of text lines by placing them within a defined blocl<. 
To do this, you must precede and follow the designated text with a block marker 
that flags the attention of the editor and signals the beginning and end of the block. 
In the case of having more than two markers, the block is defined to be the group 
of text between the first encountered set of markers within the buffer. 



Note: Do not use a line within your file that matches the block marker text designa- 
tion. 

Block markers are: 

A special text line displayed as follows 

4- 



• 



K^W4(RL OCK MflRKER»»*» 



that must be the Only text on the line itself 

• Converted to a regular text line in the file by adding, deleting, or changing 
characters within the marker 

• Automatically deleted from any text written out of the buffer 

Although block commands offer timely execution of lengthy procedures, consider 
the limitations imposed upon their function by the system, itself. For example, error 
conditions can result if you attempt to move blocked text from the top of memory 
through insufficient available RAM. Also, exercise caution when you assign a 
filename specification within the parameters of a block-read or block-write opera- 
tion so that you do not attempt to read or write to an already open file. Remember 
that the .BAK and .TMP file extensions are reserved for internal use by the editor. 
Also, if you wish to specify a drive number within a block-read or block-write 
operation, use the drive number Dn designation within your filename string. 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 21 



Command 



Explanation 



MS 



MC 



Marker Set Marker Set Inserts a block-marker text 

line Before the logical line containing 
the cursor 

Marker Clear Marker Clear Removes all block-marker 

text lines and repositions the cursor to 
the beginning of the buffer 



After setting the block markers, use the following commands to perform your in- 
tended operation. 



Command 



Explanation 



BC 



Block Copy 



Copies the marked text before the line 
on which the cursor is positioned. The 
block markers are not copied with the 
text. 



BM 



BD 



BP 



BW/-/ 



BR/-/ 



Block Move Moves a marked block of text before 

the logical line containing the cursor. 
The block markers are also moved. 

Block Delete Deletes a marked block of text. The 

block markers are also deleted. 

Block Print Prints the marked block on the system 

printer (P:). Expanding tabs and carriage 
returns are displayed as blanks. 

Block Write Writes the marked block to a disk file 

named within the delimiters. The block 
markers are not written to the file. 

Block Read Reads the disk file named within the 

delimiters and inserts that block before 
the logical line containing the cursor. 
Automatic paging will occur to read in 
the entire file if memory becomes full. 



In general, the use of these commands: 

• Positions the cursor at the beginning of the current line. 

• Scrolls the screen until the cursor is on the first line of the text window. 

Error messages that could be generated from an attempt of the above commands 
are: 



MEMORY FULL 



Results if there is not enough free 
memory to hold the entire block on a 
move or copy command. 



Operational Procedures 
22 for the Editor 



Procedure for recovery from this condi- 
tion is to: 

• Use a BW/-/ command 

• Position the cursor at the desired 
location for the block operation 

• Use a BR/-/ command 

An alternate recovery method is to: 

• Use the REOPEN command 

• Reposition the cursor at the 
desired location for the block 
operation 

• Repeat the block command 

I/O ERROR nnn May result during a print or write com- 

mand. A standard ATARI operating 
system error number is given to aid you 
in isolating the problem. 

In a print operation, the editor: 

• Aborts the command line 

• Returns to immediate mode opera- 
tion. 

In a write operation, the editor: closes 
the file. 



INSERTING AND DELETING COMMANDS 

Command Explanation 

ITA/n Inserts text string at the cursor location 

n times. If the cursor is past the last line 
in the buffer, the editor inserts a car- 
riage return to the right of the cursor 
before inserting the text. 

DBn Deletes n characters before the cursor. 

DAn Deletes n characters after the cursor. 

DFn Deletes every character between the 

beginning of the logical line and the 
current cursor location. When the cur- 
sor position is immediately past a car- 
riage return, the entire logical line is 
deleted except for the carriage return, 
itself. After this occurrence, the cursor 
moves to the beginning of this null line. 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 23 



DL/1 



RL 



Deletes the logical line containing the 
cursor. After deletion the cursor moves 
before the first character of the next 
logical line. 

Inserts the text stored in the "recover- 
line" buffer in front of the line contain- 
ing the cursor. Use this command to 
recover from accidental deletion of a 
line or to achieve a simple one-line 
move. You can insert text into the 
recover-line buffer by using a command 
or an immediate keystroke to delete a 
logical line. 



Note: The notation n signifies an optional numeric argument, which usually acts as 
a repeat counter, with a range of 1-65535. With the exception of margin values, if n 
is omitted, the editor assumes a value of 1. 



Error messages that could be generated from an attempt to use the above com- 
mands are: 



MEMORY FULL 



Results if too little free memory exists to 
allow for complete input of the string 
argument. 

Result of Operation: 

• Inserts either none, or only a part, 
of the string 

• Aborts the command line 

• Returns to immediate mode opera- 
tion 



LINE TOO LONG 



CURSOR AT END 



Results from a deletion command if the 
editor deletes a carriage return and at- 
tempts to concatenate lines that will ex- 
ceed the current line length limits. Also, 
this error condition results from text 
string insertion that causes maximum 
line length limits to be exceeded. 

Results from a deletion command if the 
cursor is at the beginning of the buffer 
when the editor attempts a deletion of 
characters before the cursor or if the 
cursor is at the end of the buffer when 
the editor attempts a deletion of 
characters after the cursor. 



Note: To delete the last carriage return in the buffer, use the delete-line command. 



Operational Procedures 
24 for the Editor 



SPECIALIZED COMMANDS 



LMn and RMn: Left and Right Margin Set Commands, if your television set needs 
adjustment to avoid cutting columns off of the display, change the left and right 
margins respectively by using these commands. Both margins are set a designated 
number of spaces dependent upon the value of n. If you omit the designation for n, 
the editor assumes a value of 1 for the left margin and a value of 40 for the right 
margin. The rule for setting the margin values is that the left margin must be greater 
than or equal to 1, but less than the value of the right margin. The right margin must 
be less than or equal to 40, but greater than the value of the left margin. 

If you attempt a designation for n that is not in conformance with the margin rule, 
the editor generates the error message MARGIN VALUE ERROR, aborts the com- 
mand line, and returns to immediate mode operation. This error condition also oc- 
curs if a new margin value causes existing command lines to exceed margin bound- 
aries. Set automatic default values for both margins by using the customizing file. 

CTSn: Convert Tabs to Spaces Command. Use this command to convert expanding 
tabs into spaces for a specified n of logical lines. If you omit the designation for n, 
the editor assumes a value of 1. Error conditions can occur in two instances: 

MEMORY FULL This error is generated when the editor 

runs out of free memory during the 
conversion. A partially converted line 
may appear above the line that is being 
executed at the time of the error condi- 
tion. 

CURSOR AT END This error is generated when the editor 

runs out of lines to convert in the 
buffer. 

Error conditions cause the editor to abort the command line and return to im- 
mediate mode operation. 

REOPEN: Reopen Editor With Same File. Use the REOPEN command to exit nor- 
mally from the editor. The editor automatically reenters the same file, retains the 
original command line, and positions the cursor to the beginning of the file. 
Minimum growth factor determinations are made by the editor. The editor displays 
a warning message if the recalculated disk free space shows a limitation. You can 
choose to leave the editor or ignore the warning and continue with your editing 
session. When you reenter, the editor ignores all commands past the REOPEN on 
the current command line and empties both command line entries. 

Use this command as a safety factor and backup procedure. Consistent and fre- 
quent implementation of the REOPEN command assures you the retention of your 
most current work in the event of an unforeseeable occurrence such as a power 
failure. Fifteen-minute interval "saves" are a common data processing practice. 

Note: If you are using more than one disk drive, the editor switches source and 
destination drives each time you execute the REOPEN command. 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 25 



PLn: Print n Lines on the System Printer. Use this command to print a specified 
number of lines on the system printer (P:). If n is not assigned, the editor assumes a 
value of 1 . If you assign a value to n that is larger than the number of lines currently 
residing in the buffer, the editor automatically u'rites out the buffer and reads in a 
new one. If the editor encounters an end-of-file before the assigned number of n 
lines has been printed, the CURSOR AT END error message results. The editor 
aborts the command line and returns to immediate mode operation. 

Printing starts from the logical line containing the cursor. Before printing the lines, 
all carriage returns and tab fields are changed to blanks. 

Cursor positioning remains stationary unless the buffer is written out. The cursor 
moves to the beginning of any newly read buffer. 

WI/-//J: Write n Lines to Disk File. Use this command to write a specified number 
of lines to the disk file designated within the delimiters. If n is not assigned, the 
editor assumes a value of 1 . If you assign a value to n that is larger than the number 
of lines currently residing in the buffer, the editor automatically writes out the buf- 
fer and reads in a new one. If the editor encounters an end-of-file before the as- 
signed number of n lines has been written, the CURSOR AT END error message 
results. The editor aborts the command line and returns to immediate mode opera- 
tion. 

Writing starts from the logical line containing the cursor. Cursor positioning re- 
mains stationary unless the buffer is written out. The cursor moves to the beginning 
of any newly read buffer. 

Caution: Remember the editor reserves .BAK and .TMP extender designations. Do 
not attempt a write or read operation to an already open file. 



LARGE FILE COMMANDS 

You can edit a file that is too large to fit into available free RAM space by using two 
specialized commands formulated specifically for this purpose. 

IH inputs half the available RAM from the file 

OC outputs text up to the current position of the cursor 

When the editor receives the IH command, its immediate response is to calculate 
available memory and input approximately half of that amount from the file into 
the buffer. After receiving the OC command, the editor outputs text from the 
beginning of the buffer up to the logical line containing the cursor. Thereafter, that 
logical line becomes the first line in the buffer. With combined use of these two 
commands, you can obtain free memory to successfully edit files larger than will fit 
into current memory. Error or warning conditions that can occur include: 

INPUT EOF The editor reaches the end of the 

specified input file. 

I/O ERROR nnn A fatal disk or printer error occurs. 

LINE TOO LONG The editor encounters a line that ex- 

ceeds the maximum line length set by 
the customizing file. 



Operational Procedures 
26 for the Editor 



CANNOT-PREVIOUS The editor cannot perform an intended 

DISK I/O ERROR function because of a previous error 

condition. 



TABLE 1 — IMMEDIATE MODE RESERVED KEYSTROKES 

^^g ♦- Move cursor left (skip across expanding 

tabs) 

-♦ Move cursor right (skip across expand- 

ing tabs) 

1 Move cursor down one physical line 
t Move cursor up one physical line 

2 Move cursor to beginning of logical line 

3 Move cursor to end of logical line 
^^ 8 Display previous screen of characters 
^^ 9 Display next screen of characters 
regular keys Insert character into text 

Prepare to insert new line(s) 

Tab to next tab stop 

Return with auto indent to same level 

Delete character left of cursor 

Delete character right of cursor 

Delete logical line containing cursor 

Toggle visible-tab mode (if expanding 
tab option selected) 

Toggle visible-carriage return mode 

Clear error window 

Execute command window 

Select alternate command line 

Change mode 

Abort command being executed 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 27 



TABLE 2 — COMMAND MODE INSTRUCTIONS 



EXIT 

EXIT2 

ABORT 

ABORT2 



SB/Vn 

SF/-/n 

SRB/-/-/n 
SRF/-/-/n 
SRVB/-/-/n 

SRVF/-/-/n 



Exit normally from edit - return to DOS 

Exit normally from edit - restart editor 

Exit without saving changes - return to 

DOS 

Exit without saving changes - restart 

editor 

Search for nth occurrence of string in 

buffer 

Search for nth occurrence of string in 

file 

Search and replace n times in buffer 

Search and replace n times in file 

Search and replace with verify n times 

in buffer 

Search and replace with verify n times 

in file 



MS 

MC 

BC 

BM 

BD 

BP 

BW/-/ 

BRA/ 

CLn 

CRn 

CUn 

CDn 

CBB 

CEB 

CBF 

CEF 

CBL 

GEL 

CCn 



Marker set 

Marker clear 

Block copy 

Block move 

Block delete 

Block print 

Block write to disk file 

Block read from disk file 

Move cursor left n characters 
Move cursor right n characters 
Move cursor up n logical lines 
Move cursor down n logical lines 
Move cursor to beginning of buffer 
Move cursor to end of buffer 
Move cursor to beginning of file 
Move cursor to end of file 
Move cursor to beginning of logical line 
Move cursor to end of logical line 
Move cursor to column n 



IT/-/n 

DBn 

DAn 

DF 

DR 

DLn 

RL 



Input string n times at cursor position 
Delete n characters before cursor 
Delete n characters after cursor 
Delete first part of logical line 
Delete remainder of logical line 
Delete n logical lines 
Recover last deleted line 



IH 
OC 



Input half of available RAM from file 
Output text to file up to line contain- 
ing cursor 



Operational Procedures 
28 for the Editor 



REOPEN Reopen editor with same file 

PLn Print n lines on system printer 

WL/-/n Write n lines to disk file 

CTSn Convert expanding tabs to spaces for n 

lines 

LMn Set left margin to width n 

RMn Set right margin to width n 



Note: n is an optional numeric argument, which usually acts as a repeat counter, 
with a range of 1-65535. With the exception of margin values, if n is omitted, the 
editor assumes a value of 1 . 

Note: "/-/" is a required character string delimited by either a pair of slashes or a 
pair of quotes. "/-/-/" is a pair of required strings delimited by either a triplet of 
slashes or a triplet of quotes. 



Operational Procedures 

for the Editor 29 



Operational Procedures 
30 for the Editor 



CUSTOMIZING THE EDITOR 



You can use the editor to full advantage by establishing specific parameters to han- 
dle distinct file extensions. For exannple, you may wish to turn off the auto- 
indention feature on all file extensions except for languages similar to PASCAL. 
Maximum line lengths for .ASM files are different than, for instance, .BAS and 
should be altered from the default value. By setting a customizing screen color you 
can visually determine the nature of your editing file. 

Customizing file alterations use the BASIC programming language. You must have 
an ATARI BASIC language cartridge inserted into the left slot of your computer con- 
sole. Refer to the ATARI 800 Operators Manual for instruction in installing a car- 
tridge. 

To load the customizing file: 

1. Place the diskette containing the editor program into your disk drive. 

2. Turn on the computer. Wait for the READY message prompt with the cursor 
to appear on the screen. 

3. Type RUN "D:MEDITCM.BAS" and press 

4. Remove the program diskette and insert your data diskette. 

The Customizing File Menu that appears will allow you to select the area in which 
you wish to change the default values. Most of the selections are self-documented. 
You can reference the instructions included in the software program or you can 
type N in response to the WOULD YOU LIKE INSTRUCTIONS? (Y/N) query and 
use this manual. 



Figure 10 Extension Group Prompt 



Customizing the Editor 31 



Refer to Figure 11. By answering the WHAT EXTENSION GROUP query, you 
establish the filename specification extension that you wish to customize. Enter the 
[?]to return to the instructions for use of the file. 



Figure 1 1 Customizing File Menu 



A- D — Parameters 

The Customizing File Menu appears as soon as you have answered the extension 
group prompt. Depending upon your choice of parameters, all changes that you 
enter into the customizing file will be retained as new values for your selected 
group. Use the first four fields of the menu, A-D, to establish the changes or to 
disregard them. Selection of A or C returns control to DOS for easy access into the 
editor. Selection of B or D reruns the customizing file. 



E — Set Tab Stops 

Selection E allows you to set your tab stop values. As the software instructions in- 
dicate, tab stop values cannot be changed during an editing session. The screen 
displays default and current tab stop values. A (Menu, Set, Clear) Select Item 
prompt appears on the screen. 

M Reruns the Customizing File Menu 

S Brings (2-199) What column to set onto the screen. Choose the column tab 
stop by pressing the number combination followed by ^^^g. All current tab 
stop values will be redisplayed. Note the inclusion of your new value. 

C Brings (2-199 or *) What column to clear onto the screen. Choose the col- 
umn tab stop by pressing the number combination followed by ^^^B- '^" 
current tab stop values will be redisplayed. Note the exclusion of your new 
value. 

Press the "*" key to clear all tab stop values. Wait for the Select-Item prompt 
to appear. Use the Set command to enter new values. 



32 Customizing the Editor 



F— Set Maximum Line Length 

Maximum line length defaults to 1 14 characters or 3 physical lines in conformance 
with the ATARI Computer's built-in operating system screen editor. The editor 
allows from 2 to 200 characters per logical line. Enter your chosen value and press 
Control automatically returns to the Customizing File Menu. 



G — Set Minimum Growth 

Use this command to determine your space allocation before receiving an I/O 
ERROR 162 (disk full) error message. You can ignore the minimum growth check 
warning and proceed with your editing session. However, be mindful of its 
usefulness as a warning device. Enter your chosen value and press ^^^S- Control 
automatically returns to the Customizing File Menu. 

H— Set Default Margins 

If display columns are being cut off at the sides of your television screen, you can 
change the left and right margins. 



I— Set Color of Screen 

Using the customizing file, you can alter three variables that precisely determine 
the color display. The first variable, indicated as COLOR, controls the background 
color selection. Refer to the following table for numbers corresponding to the color 
of your choice. 



TABLE 3— THE ATARI COLORS AND NUMBERS 

BACKGROUND CORRESPONDING 

COLORS NUMBERS 

GRAY 

LIGHT ORANGE (GOLD) 1 

ORANGE 2 

RED-ORANGE 3 

PINK 4 

PURPLE 5 

PURPLE-BLUE 6 

AZURE BLUE 7 

SKY BLUE 8 

LIGHT BLUE 9 

TURQUOISE 10 

GREEN-BLUE 11 

GREEN 12 

YELLOW-GREEN 13 

ORANGE-GREEN 14 

LIGHT ORANGE 15 

Note: Colors will vary with type and adjustment of television or monitor used. 



Customizing the Editor 33 



The second variable, B-lum, controls the luminance of the background color on 
the screen. The third variable, C-lum, controls the character luminance. 
Luminance is changed on every even number: 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, and 14. Follow 
certain rules when assigning luminance numbers to ensure a useable combination. 
To obtain the best clarity and avoid the occurrence of a blank screen: 

• Do not equate the luminance values for the two variables, B-lum and C-lum. 

• The two luminance values must be greater or less than each other by a factor 
of 8. 



Figure 12 Customizing File Submenu ) 



J— Set Miscellaneous Flags 

A — Return to Main Menu 

Return to the main menu after choosing your new values. You may then make a 
selection to retain or disregard the parameters you have selected. 

B — Set Type of Tab 

Note: Not all ATARI software recognizes expanding tabs. 

Space tabs insert a selected number of blanks between tab stops, and the cursor 
positions accordingly. Expanding tabs, however, insert a character into the text 
that indicates the tab function. 



34 Customizing the Editor 



C — Set Tab Display Method 

Expanding tabs can be conventionally displayed as spaces or usefully displayed 
as right triangles followed by periods. The value entered into this parameter can 
be displaced by an immediate mode keystroke. 



D — Set Carriage Return Display 

A carriage return can either be displayed as a space or a down arrow. The value 
entered into this parameter can be displaced by an immediate mode keystroke. 



E — Auto-Indention Feature 

Auto-indention allows you to reposition the cursor to an automatic tab stop on 
the next logical line. To activate auto-indention, you press the ^^H ^^^^1 ^^^H 
keys simultaneously. Use the customizing file to disengage this feature. 



F— Set Shifting Caselock 

After you answer the filename prompt and begin the edit of your specified file, 
this option comes into effect. Set a shift-lock for uppercase designation or a no- 
lock for upper- and lowercase. The parameter value entered may be displaced 
by using the ^^^^^8 key during an editing session. 



Customizing the Editor 35 



LIMITED 90-DAY WARRANTY 
ON ATARI® HOME COMPUTER PRODUCTS 

ATARI, INC ("ATARI") warrants to the original consumer purchaser that this ATARI Home Computer Product (not including computer pro- 
grams) shall be free from any defects in material or workmanship for a period of 90 days from the date of purchase. If any such defect is 
discovered within the warranty period, ATARI'S sole obligation will be to repair or replace, at its election, the Computer Product free of 
charge on receipt of the unit (charges prepaid, if mailed or shipped) with proof of date of purchase satisfactory to ATARI at any authorized 
ATARI Computer Service Center. For the location of an authorized ATARI Computer Service Center nearest you, call toll-free: 

In California (800) 672-1430 or write to: Atari, Inc. 

Continental U.S. (800) 538-8737 Customer Service/Field Support 

1340 Bordeaux Drive 
Sunnyvale, CA 94086 

YOU MUST RETURN DEFECTIVE COMPUTER PRODUCTS TO AN AUTHORIZED ATARI COMPUTER SERVICE CENTER FOR IN- 
WARRANTY REPAIR. 

This warranty shall not apply if the Computer Product: (i) has been misused or shows signs of excessive wear, (ii) has been damaged by be- 
ing used with any products not supplied by ATARI, or (iii) has been damaged by being serviced or modified by anyone other than an 
authorized ATARI Service Center. 

ANY APPLICABLE IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PUR- 
POSE, ARE HEREBY LIMITED TO NINETY DAYS FROM THE DATE OF PURCHASE. CONSEQUENTIAL OR INCIDENTAL DAMAGES 
RESULTING FROM A BREACH OF ANY APPLICABLE EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES ARE HEREBY EXCLUDED. Some states do not 
allow limitations on how long an implied warranty lasts or do not allow the exclusion or limitation of incidental or consequential damages, 
so the above limitations or exclusions may not apply to you. 

This warranty gives you specific legal rights and you may also have other rights which vary from state to state. 

DISCLAIMER OR WARRANTY 
ON ATARI COMPUTER PROGRAMS 

All ATARI computer programs are distributed on an "as is" basis without warranty of any kind. The entire risk as to the quality and perfor- 
mance of such programs is with the purchaser. Should the programs prove defective following their purchase, the purchaser and not the 
manufacturer, distributor, or retailer assumes the entire cost of all necessary servicing or repair. 

ATARI shall have no liability or responsibility to a purchaser, customer, or any other person or entity with respect to any liability, loss, or 
damage caused directly or indirectly by computer programs sold by ATARI. This disclaimer includes but is not limited to any interruption of 
service, loss of business or anticipatory profits, or consequential damages resulting from the use or operation of such computer programs. 

REPAIR SERVICE 

If your ATARI Home Computer Product requires repair other than under warranty, please contact your local authorized ATARI Computer 
Service Center for repair information. 

IMPORTANT: If you ship your ATARI Home Computer Product, package it securely and ship it, charges prepaid and insured, by parcel post 
or United Parcel Service. 



EDITOR MESSAGES 



Warnings 

USING DEFAULTS 

NEW FILE 

INPUT EOF 

CANNOT-PREVIOUS 
DISK I/O ERROR 
CURSOR AT END 

Prompt Messages 

VERIFY(REPLACE, 
SKIP,QUIT)? 

Error Messages 

MARGIN VALUE ERROR 
LINE TOO LONG 

MEMORY FULL 

ILLEGAL 
DEV:FILE.EXT 

DELIMITER ERROR 

SEARCH FAILED 

NOT COMPLETE 

UNRECOGNIZED 
COMMAND 

BREAK KEY 
ABORT 

I/O ERROR nnn 

NUMBER TOO BIG 

CANNOT FIND 
MARKED BLOCK 

CANNOT FIND FILE 

EDITOR IS CONFUSED 



FILE LOCKED 

EDITOR CANNOT 
RUN-NO FREE lOCBs 



No customizing file was found that matched the extension of the filename, so the editor uses its built-in 
defaults. 

The file named to be edited does not exist; therefore, the editor creates a new file using the specified 
name given at the prompt. 

The end of file has been reached on the input file. 

Refer to a previous execution for cause of error. Use of EXIT, IH, or OC commands may be restricted. 

Occurs whenever the cursor tries to move past either end of the text buffer. 



Displays in the error window before each replacement while executing a search-and-replace-with-verify 
command. 



Occurs when a designation for n is not in conformance with the margin rule. 

Occurs whenever the addition of text to the current line causes it to exceed the maximum line length set 
by the customizing file. 

Means that there is not enough free RAM in the buffer to carry out the operation. 

Tells you that the last filename prompt was incorrectly answered. 

Tells you that the command being entered into the command window requires a slash (/) or double 
quotation mark (") for proper syntax. 

Occurs when a search command was executed and the search string could not be found. 

Occurs when you try to execute the command window when an incomplete command line exists there. 

Occurs when you type an invalid character into the command window. 

Acknowledges that you have pressed the ^!^^^ key during execution of the command window. 

Tells you that a fatal disk or printer error has occurred, nnn is an error number generated by the 
operating system. Refer to the ATARI Disk Operating System II Reference Manua/. 

Tells you that the argument n given in the command window is too large for the command specified or 
the current line length limit. 

Means that the editor could not find a marked block of text while executing a BC, BD, BM, BP, BW/-/, or 
BR/-/ command. 

Means that the editor could not find the file requested in a BR/-/ command. 

Occurs when internal editing pointers have been damaged. Try immediate mode keystrokes ^^^ 2 
and ^^B *~ '^"*^'' y^^ '^° longer receive this error message. (If this error should occur, it would be 
helpful to us if you could find a repeatable sequence of events that reproduces it and report to ATARI 
Customer Service.) 

Means that the file you requested to edit is locked or the'associated .BAK or .TMP file is locked. 

Occurs if you have attempted to use any other DOS but 2.0S; or if you have called the editor directly, 
and at least three available lOCBs do not exist. 



Note: n is an optional numeric argument, which usually acts as a repeat counter, with a range of 1-65535. With the exception of margin 
values, if n is omitted, the editor assumes a value of 1 . 



ATARI' 



PRINTED IN U.S.A. 



A Warner Communications Company